2023 Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges


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ABOUT THE STUDY

The MPPWCC survey consists of approximately 60 items, organized into 10 major sections. For example, one section elicits contact information for the survey respondent and identifying information about their respective institution (e.g., control, minority-serving institutions [MSI] status). Another section includes several items to assess the structural diversity of the institution and relevant departments in terms of gender, race, sexual orientation, and disability status. There are several sections that measure the availability and extent of support services provided to community college staff on campus, such as professional development.

The survey was developed by Dr. Terrell Strayhorn and is not available in the public domain. The original survey was pilot-tested with a small sample of institutions; feedback from the pilot study helped to clarify survey items, correct logic sequencing, and determine the utility of the scoring algorithm. All survey rights belong to the author. All analyses presented in this edition were conducted by Terrell Strayhorn and Royel Johnson.

ABOUT THE SURVEY

The Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges (MPPWCC) survey consists of approximately 60 items, organized into 10 major sections. For example, one section elicits contact information for the survey respondent and identifying information about their respective institution (e.g., control, minority-serving institutions [MSI] status). Another section includes several items to assess the structural diversity of the institution and relevant departments in terms of gender, race, sexual orientation and disability status. There are several sections that measure the availability and extent of support services provided to community college staff on campus, such as professional development.

The survey was developed by Terrell Strayhorn and is not available in the public domain. The original survey was pilot-tested with a small sample of institutions; feedback from the pilot study helped clarify survey items, correct logic sequencing and determine the utility of the scoring algorithm. All survey rights belong to the author. All analyses presented in this edition were conducted by Strayhorn and Royel Johnson.

METHODOLOGY

Promising Places were selected based on a comprehensive analysis of results from an annual survey that was administered to all institutional members of NISOD. Scores were computed using the algorithm that considers weighted data for all points highlighted on the survey such as diversity benefits, staff demographics and diversity policies (e.g., bias monitoring, staff orientation). As the number of respondents to the annual survey grows each year, the algorithm properly adjusts for the diversity of institutions included in the final pool. For instance, the analysis is sensitive to the availability, presence and use of inclusive practices, staff supports and diversity initiatives, not the size of one’s institution or staff. For full discussion of these methods, see previous versions of this report in Diverse.

COMMUNITY COLLEGE WORKPLACES

Today’s community colleges are as diverse as the students they serve. There are more than 1,100 community colleges in the United States that educate more than 12 million students each year. Community colleges also employ thousands of staff members who work in critical functional areas, including student affairs or support services. These committed professionals strive to make the institution warm and welcoming for all other personnel and students, so that they can develop, grow, learn and thrive optimally.

This year’s list of the Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges includes an impressive cast of 2-year institutions that specialize in equipping students for securing the promises of a bright future. Each of them has signature programs and marquee initiatives that make them uniquely who they are. Promising Places is a national recognition that celebrates student affairs workplaces that are vibrant, diverse, supportive and committed to staff work-life balance, professional development and inclusive excellence.

In this edition of Diverse, we strive to pull back the curtain, so to speak, so that others can see the good work going on at these institutions and learn from them to affirm new or improve existing community college workplaces. MPPWCC offers institutional leaders information that can be used to improve work environments, boost morale, or continuously improve practices across the student affairs division. It also serves as a useful tool for employers, career services staff and job seekers across the country.

KEY LESSONS LEARNED

Here is what we’ve learned from readers since the initial launch of the Promising Places projects back in 2014:

  • Employers use this national recognition to celebrate their success in creating a vibrant workplace for staff and they mention the award on their job placement website, position announcements, and recruiting materials;
  • Career counselors interpret the award to mean that the campus offers high-quality support to staff, respectable compensation and benefits, and best forms of practice in terms of diversity and inclusive policies;
  • Presidents and provosts acknowledge the national recognition as a mark of distinction, celebrating the strength and success of their respective institution’s student affairs operation and incorporate this information in reports of institutional effectiveness/accreditation;
  • Vice presidents, deans and senior student affairs officers at community colleges and similar institutions use the information in this special edition of Diverse to develop new or revise existing staff programs and services. For instance, one senior administrator credited the MPPWCC project for several new benefits offered to staff at her institution including flexible work hours, a staff mentoring program and a new “Voice of the Employee” (VoE) initiative.

“I literally organized my recent job search around Promising Places. I went to the Diverse: Issues In Higher Education website, found the list of featured community colleges, studied the salary, benefits, and all [emphasis added] the forms of support…then applied to only those schools that offered what I was looking for.” -Marta, learning director, hired since MPPWCC‘21

“Part of our strategy for accreditation and institutional effectiveness at [community college] is to provide direct evidence of achieving campus goals related to staff diversity, faculty support, and professional development. We included our response to the Promising Places survey, as well as the special edition, in our midterm follow-up [report]. It’s been great for making program improvements.”-Sebastian, institutional research specialist

PROMISING PRACTICES AT COMMUNITY COLLEGES

As the Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges project evolves, we learn more and more about what various institutions do to increase faculty and staff diversity, to foster staff sense of belonging and to equip college student educators for their work with students. Presented here is a set of “promising practices” that have held up across each year of the study.

Promising Practice #1: Recognition of Good Work

Each year, we hear from faculty and staff who work at community colleges about the importance of good work being recognized, especially by those in leadership positions. Specifically, institutions recognized as Most Promising Places over the past few years have been known for hosting formal ceremonies that recognize the meaningful contributions of various members of the staff community. Quite often, faculty and staff described this practice as a positive feature of institutional culture that helped to retain them as well as their colleagues. In addition to institutional awards and ceremonies, many faculty and staff noted that their campus leadership nominated them for regional and national awards, honors, and recognitions sponsored by professional associations. We encourage community college leaders to adopt similar practices or approaches for recognizing the good work of staff and members of the campus community, especially in areas affecting DEIB and campus climate.

Promising Practice #2: Commitment to Meeting the Needs of Community

The espoused mission of community colleges includes a clear focus on serving the needs of the local community. Therefore, it is no surprise that faculty and staff at institutions designated as Most Promising Places underscored the importance of their institutions living up to this responsibility. Over the years, faculty and staff have consistently shared insights about their institution’s connection to, service of, and appreciation for the communities in which they are located. Some institutions provide support to the local business community through rapid responses, professional development, incubating start-ups, and workplace training that meets the needs of today’s labor market. Other institutions signal the importance of community engagement by having cabinet-level leadership in the area like a Vice President of Diversity or a Dean of Community Impact. Recently recognized MPPWCCs and this year’s featured schools host summits on racial justice, comprising keynote presentations, panel discussions, and roundtables that connect community to campus. We encourage all community college leaders and their respective institutions to truly be members of their local communities, serving the needs of the people on campus and beyond. Share more than a zip code; devise ways to share capital — human, fiscal, physical, and, most importantly, intellectual.

Promising Practice #3: Investment in the Development of Faculty and Staff

Institutions represented among our Most Promising Places over the years have prioritized significant investment in the professional development of faculty and staff to better prepare them for leadership within the organization and broader community. Faculty and staff at institutions recognized as Most Promising Places over the years have discussed at length the ways in which their institutions have committed to investing in their professional development. For instance, at Montgomery County Community College, faculty and staff highlighted the Faculty Diversity Fellows program for junior minority faculty and the President’s Leadership Academy for staff members considered “rising leaders” within the institution. Likewise, Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) staff members report that there were always resources available to support their pursuit of professional development on and off campus, including book clubs, conference attendance, employee resource groups, webinars and on-campus leadership training seminars. We learned last year that Coastline Community College hosts a college-wide training on equity mindset and two all-college flex days on topics ranging from data visualization to equity. Interestingly, CCAC staff noted that the campus offers a range of electronic supports like online diversity training, online civility courses and LYNDA online training with closed captioning. We encourage senior leaders at community colleges to make concerted investments in formal professional development activities for faculty and staff by adopting ideas listed here and in previous editions of this report.

In addition to these promising practices, we offer the following six recommendations for fostering diversity, achieving equity, and promoting inclusion at community colleges:

SIX MAJOR RECOMMENDATIONS


  • Recruit Diverse Staff. Take active steps to recruit diverse staff, including senior administrators, faculty, and student affairs personnel.
  • Foster Inclusive Workplaces. Beyond hiring staff, take active steps to foster inclusive work environments on campus by diversifying ranks, inviting input.
  • Offer Family Care Services. Take active steps to build and pro- mote family-friendly workplaces by offering family care, family leave, and “bring family to work” days.
  • Expand Staff Leave Policies. Most higher education workplaces offer staff sick and vacation leave. But Promising Places go the extra mile by providing caregiving, educational, and mental health leave to help staff.
  • Consider Flexible Schedules. Many MPPWCCs offer telecom- muting although virtually all rely on it now due to COVID-19. Flex options and part-time mobility may be critical.
  • Prioritize Health and Wellness. Burnout is a problem in higher education staffing. Promising Places offer stress-reduction, gym, telehealth, and gym membership benefits to support staff health, fitness, and wellness.

THERE'S NO "I" IN MPPWCC: IT TAKES TEAMWORK TO DO THIS WORK

Our team gets this question all the time: who’s responsible for the institution "winning" the MPPWCC award? This question has been raised by governing board members, community college presidents, vice presidents, and, in some cases, from senior student affairs officers themselves. Usually, the question seeks to identify the single person or office that deserves credit for earning this national recognition. After nearly a decade of leading this project, here’s what we as Co-PIs have learned: “There’s no ‘I’ in MPPWCC” and there’s good reason for it. Earning this national recognition requires true teamwork and winning institutions make it a campus-wide priority.

It may sound cliché, but achieving diversity is truly everyone’s job. No single person or unit can do it all, nor should they. It takes a village — well, a team — to promote diversity, achieve equity, foster inclusion, pursue justice, and boost belonging in higher education workplaces, including our nation’s more than 2,000 community colleges. These terms must be more than buzzwords and must deeply infuse day-to-day operations, campus policies, HRTM practices, and business intelligence. Winning institutions know the difference between them and use that understanding to bring talented people in as staff and leaders, to remove systemic barriers that shut some people out, and create inclusive practices to ensure that all staff members feel heard, seen, and visible as reflected in the institution’s staff profile, equitable pay structure, core values, and DEI commitments, to give a few examples.

There are many versions of this in the public domain, but we present this as a basic guide for readers. Diversity asks: Who’s present? Equity asks: Who’s (still) attempting to enter the room but can’t? What obstacles exist, seen and unseen? Inclusion asks: Are all people’s opinions heard, valued, and understood? Belonging asks: Does everyone in the room feel respected and free to be themselves, just as they are? Justice asks: How, or why, are our systems harming or limiting people? How do we fix them? And, all of these come together in ways that lead to intentional actions or steps to achieve positive results, while paying close attention to people’s experiences along the way. Promising Places to Work create a culture of evidence-based decision-making that leads to implementation, experimentation, and even revision of promising practices, policies, and programs like those mentioned in this year’s report. It’s not that they do one thing well or depend on a single office or person, but rather they have developed a constellation of supportive policies, equity-minded practices, and cutting-edge DEI programs that provide community college employees with a positive work environment, equitable pay, opportunities for advancement, and meaningful work that contributes to the institution’s bottom line and their personal/professional goals.

Promising Places to Work create a culture of evidencebased decision-making that leads to implementation, experimentation, and even revision of promising practices, policies, and programs like those mentioned in this year’s report. It’s not that they do one thing well or depend on a single office or person, but rather they have developed a constellation of supportive policies, equity-minded practices, and cutting-edge DEI programs that provide community college employees with a positive work environment, equitable pay, opportunities for advancement, and meaningful work that contributes to the institution’s bottom line and their personal/professional goals.

On many campuses, promising practices, programs, and services are “housed” across divisions. They’re in human resources and talent management. Diversity and inclusion. Academic and student affairs. Athletics and intramural sports, to name a few. So, the answer to the question “who’s responsible” is simple: everyone! When the institution wins, everyone wins.

Again, congratulations to this year’s highly selective set of Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges!:

ENGAGE US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

We invite readers to share how they’re using this year’s report of Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges (MPPWCC). Share with us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram using #PPWCC21 and tag @DiverseIssues and @NISOD.

BIOGRAPHIES

Dr. Terrell Lamont Strayhorn is provost and senior vice president of academic affairs at Virginia Union University, where he also serves as professor of urban education and director of the Center for the Study of HBCUs. Additionally, he is president and CEO of Do Good Work Educational Consulting LLC, a research firm that partners with leading colleges and schools to improve policy and practice, as a way of ensuring all students’ success. Author of 11 books, more than 200 journal articles, chapters and reports, Strayhorn is an internationally known student success expert and public speaker. Diverse Issues named him an Emerging Scholar in 2011 and he has received ACPA’s Emerging Scholar, Annuit Coeptis and Diamond Honoree Awards. @tlstrayhorn

Dr. Royel M. Johnson is assistant professor of higher education at Pennsylvania State University. As a scholar, Johnson engages in interdisciplinary research on issues related to educational access, equity and student success. He is co-editor of three forthcoming books and has published two dozen academic publications. For his early career contributions to higher education and student affairs research, ACPA-College Student Educators International named him an Emerging Scholar in 2020. @royeljohnson

Institution2020202120222023 New Comer
Austin Community Collegex
Bergen Community Collegex
Blinn Collegexx
Broward Collegex
Community College of Allegheny Countyxxx
Garden City Community Collegex
Harrisburg Area Community Collegexx
Hudson County Community Collegex
Joliet Junior Collegex
Lorain County Community Collegex
Malcolm X Collegexx
McLennan Community Collegexxx
Montgomery County Community Collegexx
National Park Collegex
Nicolet Collegexx
Northeast Lakeview Collegexxx
Nunez Community Collegex
Olive-Harvey Collegex
Pellissippi State Community Collegex
San Antonio Collegexx

Most Promising Place to Work in Community College Profiles


Austin Community College

Austin Community College

The Austin Community College District (ACCD) is a public community college system in Texas that serves the metropolitan Austin area and surrounding Central Texas communities. There are several campuses and centers as well as online options that offer degree programs, continuing education and certificate programs. “We strive to create a space where everyone feels supported and appreciated,” says Dr. Richard M. Rhodes, ACCD’s chancellor. “Building a culture like that takes all of us working together on a shared vision to connect, collaborate and demonstrate care.”
Bergen Community College

Bergen Community College

The largest community college in New Jersey, Bergen Community College (BCC) ranks No. 1 in the state for associate degree graduates. Alumni have gone on to attend prestigious four-year colleges and universities, including all eight Ivy League institutions. “I am so proud of our entire community for embracing our central mission of education, diversity, equity and inclusion,” says Dr. Eric M. Friedman, BCC’s president. “Our progress is being recognized and it makes us so grateful.”
Blinn College

Blinn College

Blinn College is a public institution in Brenham, Texas, that boasts the highest transfer rate to four-year institutions of any community college in the state. More than 100 years old, Blinn produces graduates who have gone on to attend prestigious four-year institutions such as Texas A&M University. “This award is a testament to the hard work, dedication and commitment we all have invested in creating a positive and fulfilling workplace culture,” says Chancellor Dr. Mary Hensley.
Broward College

Broward College

As part of the Florida College System, Broward College serves approximately 63,000 students annually at its three campuses and additional partnerships around Broward County. “This honor acknowledges Broward College’s talent activation efforts, where the best ideas are elevated regardless of the area they come from, and the contributions of all team members are valued,” says Gregory Adam Haile, Broward College’s president. “By empowering our most valuable assets, we are positively impacting our students and our community.”
Community College of Allegheny County

Community College of Allegheny County

With four campuses serving a combined 40,000 students, the Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) in Pennsylvania offers associate degrees, certificates, and diplomas. “This distinction attests to CCAC’s strong commitment to diversity, inclusion and the dignity of all individuals,” says Dr. Quintin Bullock, CCAC’s president. “We honor and embrace diversity by creating a welcoming, inclusive college culture that respects individual differences and values the unique experiences and perspectives of all our students, faculty and staff.”
Garden City Community College

Garden City Community College

Garden City Community College is a public institution in Kansas, established more than a century ago. It serves students preparing to transfer to a four-year institution as well as individuals building career skills. “The college’s diversity, equity and inclusion committee, which is a cross-representation of employees and students across campus, was created to promote and enhance the development and implementation of [best] practices and professional development to increase awareness and competence of diversity in a global society,” says Dr. Ryan Ruda, Garden City Community College’s president.
Harrisburg Area Community College

Harrisburg Area Community College

Harrisburg Area Community College is one of the oldest community colleges in Pennsylvania. It serves approximately 17,000 students pursuing associate degrees and over 8,300 workforce development and remedial students. “Our core values of caring by creating our future together — caring for each other and caring by doing what is right — guide our actions and decisions every day as we prioritize creating a work environment where our employees can thrive professionally and personally,” says Jennifer T. Padlan, vice president of human resources and organizational development.
Hudson County Community College

Hudson County Community College

Hudson County Community College in Jersey City, N.J. is a public college offering both associate degrees and certificate programs in a wide variety of career opportunities. “Hudson County Community College is thriving because our faculty, staff and students care deeply about one another and share a collective vision focused on best practices in student success and diversity, equity and inclusion,” says Dr. Christopher M. Reber, the institution’s president. “We are proud to invest heavily in employee professional development.”
Joliet Junior College

Joliet Junior College

Joliet Junior College (JJC) is the first public community college founded in the U.S. Approximately 48,000 students per year enroll in the college’s academic and non-credit programs at JJC’s three campuses and three centers. “We are challenging our faculty, staff, and students to have difficult conversations in the DEI space and emphasizing we are people before we are employees or students. This has been reflected in the internal and external environment our campus community is thriving in,” says Dr. Clyne G. H. Namuo, JCC’s president.
Lorain County Community College

Lorain County Community College

Part of the University System of Ohio, Lorain County Community College (LCCC) is based in the city of Elyria with learning centers in Wellington, North Ridgeville, and Lorain. It offers associate degrees and certificates as well as bachelor’s and master’s degrees through partnerships with universities. “This recognition is a reflection of LCCC’s deep commitment to valuing our faculty and staff who dedicate themselves to helping students succeed and our community thrive,” says Dr. Marcia J. Ballinger, LCCC’s president.
Malcolm X College

Malcolm X College

Part of City Colleges of Chicago, Malcolm X College works with healthcare and industry partners to provide students with career-oriented education. “It has always been paramount for me to truly show I care about the people I work with every day,” says David A. Sanders, Malcolm X’s president. “Being of service to the public is a calling, and while I challenge my faculty and staff to bring their A-game to work in service to others, I know I in turn must earn their trust and respect.”
McLennan Community College

McLennan Community College

Based in Waco, Texas, McLennan Community College serves more than 9,000 students who intend to transfer to a four-year institution, earn an associate degree, earn a certificate to enhance skills or jump-start a career. “Our core value that ‘inclusiveness matters’ causes us to care about creating a civil, welcoming environment where our diverse community of students and employees learn, teach and work together,” says President Dr. Johnette McKown. “We desire to be a place where our employees choose to work and where students feel welcome.”
Montgomery County Community College

Montgomery County Community College

With two campuses, Montgomery County Community College in Pennsylvania offers a variety of degree programs and non-credit programs. It has offered online classes for over 25 years. “Our deep commitment to equity, diversity and belonging is engrained in every aspect of our policies, practices and daily work,” says President Victoria L. Bastecki-Perez. “[We are] an institution with an inclusive culture where everyone feels valued and respected through the collective efforts of our faculty, staff, administrators and board of trustees.”
National Park College

National Park College

National Park College is a public community college in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and one of the largest community colleges in the state, enrolling approximately 3,000 students each year in credit programs and 3,800 in non-credit programs. “We value our employees’ dedication to our students’ success, and we know an investment in our employees will always pay off,” says President Dr. John Hogan. “Diversity, equity and inclusion are woven into our strategic plan and our academic objectives.”
Nicolet College

Nicolet College

Nicolet College, part of the Wisconsin Technical College System, is a two-year technical college with its main campus in Rhinelander, Wis. “We believe that every employee contributes to the success of the college, and our culture must reflect the willingness to act together toward a preferred future,” says President Kate Ferrel. “Our strategic action plans are intentionally built to create a welcoming and inclusive environment where all of our learners, employees and strategic partners can thrive.”
Northeast Lakeview College

Northeast Lakeview College

Northeast Lakeview College (NLC), part of the Alamo Colleges District, offers associate degree programs in the liberal arts, teaching, and applied science as well as Level 1 certificates and continuing education. “Northeast Lakeview College focuses on creating a respectful and inclusive environment where people’s needs, ideas and involvement are critical parts of college operations,” says Dr. Veronica Garcia, NLC’s president. “I am inspired by NLC’s commitment to our value of ‘respect for all’ and dedication to meet the needs of the diverse community that we serve.”
Nunez Community College

Nunez Community College

Nunez Community College in Chalmette, Louisiana, describes itself as a student-centered institution that delivers relevant and innovative curriculum, integrating the arts, sciences and humanities and leading to academic credentials and workforce opportunities. “We offer professional staff development, such as our internal Pelican Leadership Development Program, to support emerging leaders,” says Dr. Tina Tinney, Nunez Community College’s president. “We also have embraced courageous conversations on campus to confront challenges and identify opportunities to improve our campus environment for both employees and students.”
Olive-Harvey College

Olive-Harvey College

Olive-Harvey College is part of the City Colleges of Chicago. It is a center of excellence in transportation, distribution, and logistics, one of the region’s fastest growing industry segments. The curriculum focuses on key modes of transportation, such as air, rail and road. “We walk side-by-side with our students as they set and reach their goals, and the supportive and compassionate community we have here extends to our faculty and staff,” says Dr. Kimberly Hollingsworth, Olive-Harvey College’s president.
Pellissippi State Community College

Pellissippi State Community College

Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tenn., serves approximately 10,000 students per year between one main campus and four satellite campuses. “We have been intentional about embedding our mission and core values in our strategic planning, including our recruitment and retention efforts,” says President Dr. L. Anthony Wise Jr. “The prioritization of improving outcomes with an eye toward equity, professional development, learning opportunities and community service has led to positive results for our students and employees even in the midst of challenge and change.”
San Antonio College

San Antonio College

San Antonio College (SAC) in Texas describes itself as having a university-like feel. The college, which is part of the Alamo College District, serves approximately 20,000 students each semester. “SAC is proud to be recognized for our commitment to the very highest standards in teaching, learning and leadership,” says Naydeen González-De Jesús, SAC’s president. “We work to foster diversity at every level of our organization, always staying laser-focused on our number one goal: student success.”

ENROLLMENT TYPE


InstitutionTypeEnrollment
Austin Community CollegeHSI20k or more
Bergen Community CollegeHSI10-15k
Blinn CollegePWI20k or more
Broward CollegeHSI20k or more
College of the MainlandHSI1-5k
Community College of Allegheny CountyPWI15-20k
Garden City Community CollegeHSI1-5k
GateWay Community College(AZ)HSI5-10k
Harrisburg Area Community CollegePWI15-20k
Houston Community CollegeHSI20k or more
Hudson County Community CollegeHSI5-10k
Joliet Junior CollegeHSI-Aspiring20k or more
Lorain County Community CollegePWI5-10k
Malcolm X CollegePBI/HSI10-15k
Maricopa Community CollegesHSI20k or more
McLennan Community CollegeHSI-Aspiring5-10k
Montgomery County Community CollegePWI15-20k
National Park CollegePWI1-5k
Nicolet CollegePWI1-5k
Northeast Lakeview CollegeHSI5-10k
Nunez Community CollegeOTHER1-5k
Olive-Harvey CollegePBI1-5k
Pellissippi State Community CollegePWI1-5k
San Antonio CollegeHSI15-20k

DEMOGRAPHICS


InstitutionFTPTWOMEN (%)BLACK (%)LATINX (%)API (%)AI/AN (%)
Austin Community College170013559153351
Bergen Community College3301715892160
Blinn College6781725911920
Broward College10637686335294nr
College of the Mainland21512366172542
Community College of Allegheny County408265920111
Garden City Community College20864583321nr
GateWay Community College(AZ)25720057745nr
Harrisburg Area Community College25856616231
Houston Community College13611953nr362110nr
Hudson County Community College265282631734171
Joliet Junior College4353096391222
Lorain County Community College3403136210901
Malcolm X College21716349501211
Maricopa Community Colleges3207296556718nr2
McLennan Community College3389864121612
Montgomery County Community College28078611436nr
National Park College145112621100
Nicolet College1043600011
Northeast Lakeview College99607114541nr
Nunez Community College64105933nr31
Olive-Harvey College18818654671100
Pellissippi State Community College303280629110
San Antonio College3561246376211

DIVERSITY BENEFITS


InstitutionCDOFlexible WorkCOMP WorkWork From HomeStress Reduction ProgramEd. LeaveReading GroupsCE Credit
Austin Community CollegeYESYESNOYESYESYESNOYES
Bergen Community CollegeNONONONOYESYESYESYES
Blinn CollegeYESYESYESNOYESYESYESNO
Broward CollegeYESYESNOYESYESYESYESYES
College of the MainlandYESNONOYESYESYESYESYES
Community College of Allegheny CountyYESYESYESYESYESYESYESYES
Garden City Community CollegeNOYESNOYESYESYESYESYES
GateWay Community College(AZ)YESYESYESYESYESYESYESYES
Harrisburg Area Community CollegeYESYESYESNOYESYESYESYES
Houston Community CollegeYESYESNONOYESYESYESNO
Hudson County Community CollegeYESYESYESYESNOYESNOYES
Joliet Junior CollegeYESYESYESYESYESYESYESYES
Lorain County Community CollegeYESYESYESYESYESYESYESYES
Malcolm X CollegeYESYESYESYESYESYESNOYES
Maricopa Community CollegesNOYESYESYESYESYESYESYES
McLennan Community CollegeYESYESYESYESYESYESYESYES
Montgomery County Community CollegeYESYESYESYESYESYESYESYES
National Park CollegeNOYESNOYESNOYESYESYES
Nicolet CollegeYESYESNOYESYESYESYESYES
Northeast Lakeview CollegeYESYESNOYESYESNOYESYES
Nunez Community CollegeYESYESYESNOYESYESNOYES
Olive-Harvey CollegeYESNOYESYESYESYESYESYES
Pellissippi State Community CollegeYESYESNONOYESYESYESYES
San Antonio CollegeYESYESYESYESYESNOYESYES


CDO = chief diversity officer or equivalent at or near cabinet-level. COMP = compressed work schedule. CE = continuing education.