College Board Reports ‘Modest’ Tuition Increases

College Board Reports ‘Modest’ Tuition Increases

In two reports released here last month, the College Board announced that college tuition and fees in the 2000-’01 academic year have increased an average of 4.8 percent at four-year colleges and from 5.2 percent at two-year institutions.
Calling the increases modest, College Board President Gaston Caperton says the report’s findings mean “that a college education is still well within the grasp of all Americans,” and that students and their families should consider the cost of a college education as “an investment that provides personal and financial dividends for a lifetime.”
According to the report, Trends in College Pricing 2000, this year’s undergraduates will pay on average from $56 to $814 more than last year for tuition and fees.
Based on the type of institution, students can expect to pay:
l $814 more at four-year, private institutions, a 5.2 percent increase from $15,518 l to $16,332;
l $148 more at four-year, public institutions, a 4.4 percent increase from $3,362 to $3,510;
l $490 more at two-year, private institutions, a 7 percent increase from $6,968 to $7,458;
l $56 more at two-year, public institutions, a 3.4 percent increase from $1,649 to $1,705.
The study also reports a record $68 million was available last year in federal financial aid, due largely to recent increases in Pell grant appropriations. 



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