Emerging Academics in Print

Emerging Academics in Print

Soul on Soul: The Life and Music of
Mary Lou Williams
By Dr. Tammy Kernodle
Northeastern University Press, April 2004, 348 pp., $30 cloth, ISBN 1-55553-606-9Pianist, composer and arranger, Mary Lou Williams (1910–1981), was one of the most significant and influential artists in the history of jazz. Yet throughout her prolific career of nearly six decades, she battled as an African American woman to achieve recognition, equality and acceptance in the male-dominated world of jazz. In this definitive volume, Dr. Tammy Kernodle affirms Williams’ artistic brilliance and lasting legacy, interweaving biographical details with incisive commentary on her music, performances and recordings. Dr. Tammy L. Kernodle is an associate professor of musicology at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.
Time on Two Crosses: The Collected Writings of Bayard Rustin
Edited by Devon W. Carbado and Donald Weise, Cleis Press, 2003, 355 pp., $16.95, Trade paper, ISBN 1-57344-174-0Time on Two Crosses showcases the extraordinary career of the famed openly-gay civil rights pioneer Bayard Rustin, who taught Martin Luther King Jr. strategies of nonviolence during the Montgomery Bus Boycott, thereby launching the birth of the civil rights movement. Spanning five decades, the book combines classic texts ranging in topic from Gandhi’s impact on African Americans, White supremacists in Congress, the antiwar movement and the assassination of Malcolm X. The book also includes never-before published selections on the call for gay rights, Louis Farrakhan, affirmative action, AIDS and women’s rights. Devon W. Carbado is a professor of law and African American studies at the University of California, Los Angeles and Donald Weise is the co-editor of The Huey P. Newton Reader.
The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and The Rise of Black Internationalism
By Dr. Brent Edwards, Harvard University Press, 2003 407 pp., $55.00 cloth, ISBN 0-674-01022-1, $24.95 paperback, ISBN 0-674-01103-1 The Practice of Diaspora revisits Black transnational culture in the 1920s and 1930s, paying particular attention to links between intellectuals in New York and their Francophone counterparts in Paris. Dr. Brent Edwards suggests that Diaspora is less a historical condition than a set of practices: the claims, correspondences and collaborations through which Black intellectuals pursue a variety of international alliances. In reading a diverse archive — the works of writers and editors from Langston Hughes, René Maran and Claude McKay to Paulette Nardal, Alain Locke, W.E.B. Du Bois, George Padmore and Tiemoko Garan Kouyaté — Edwards takes account of the highly divergent ways of imagining race beyond the barriers of nation and language.Dr. Brent Edwards is an associate professor of English at Rutgers University.
The Color of School Reform: Race,
Politics and the Challenge of Urban Education
Edited by Dr. Jeffrey R. Henig, Dr. Richard C. Hula,
Dr. Marion Orr and Dr. Desiree S. Pedescleaux
Princeton University Press, 1999, 320 pp., $23.95 paper, ISBN 0-691-08897-7In this groundbreaking work, political scientists examine education reform in Atlanta, Baltimore, Detroit and Washington, D.C., where local governmental authority has passed from White to Black leaders. The authors show that Black administrative control of big-city school systems has not translated into broad improvements in the quality of public education within Black-led cities. Race can be crucial, however, in fostering the broad civic involvement perhaps most needed for school reform. Dr. Jeffrey R. Henig is professor of political science at George Washington University; Dr. Richard C. Hula is professor of political science and urban affairs at Michigan State University; Dr. Marion Orr is associate professor of political science and urban studies at Brown University; and Dr. Desiree S. Pedescleaux is associate professor of political science at Spelman College.



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