Youth Should Get Cyber Ethics at Home, Survey Says

Youth Should Get Cyber Ethics at Home, Survey Says

WASHINGTON
It’s the parents’ primary responsibility to teach kids respect for copyrighted works, according to a new survey on Internet downloading ethics commissioned by the Business Software Alliance (BSA).
The survey reveals that 4 out of 5 (78 percent) respondents say parents bear the most responsibility in teaching the nation’s youth to respect copyrighted material such as software, music and movies. Only 14 percent of U.S. adults say it is a shared responsibility between parents and teachers while just 7 percent think teachers are most responsible. Ipsos Public Affairs recently conducted the study in an omnibus survey of 1,000 respondents.
“Given how many children use computers and have Internet access at school, it is even more important that both parents and teachers take an active role in teaching computer ethics and safe computer use,” said Diane Smiroldo, vice president of public affairs for BSA.
Other results of the survey indicate:
• Nearly all (95 percent) believe it is a “big deal” if a young person shoplifts a software program, CD or DVD from a store, yet about 1 in 3 (30 percent) say downloading files on the Internet without permission is acceptable.
• Sixty-three percent believe it is never okay to download copyrighted works, such as a song or software, without authorization.
In an effort to guide parents and educators in teaching children about respect for digital works online, BSA offers parents, teachers and students a variety of materials and tools on cyber ethics, including its curriculum, “Play It Safe In Cyberspace.” The curriculum is available for free download at <www.PlayitCyberSafe.com> and was co-produced by children’s publisher, Weekly Reader. 



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