Measuring Racial Discrimination

Measuring Racial Discrimination
Panel on Methods for Assessing Discrimination,
Eds. Rebecca M. Blank, Marilyn Dabady and Constance F. Citro
The National Academies Press, 2004
336 pp., $44.95,
hardcover ISBN 0-309-09126-8;
$30.50 PDF book ISBN 0-309-53083-0

Many racial and ethnic groups in the United States, including Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, Native Americans, and others, have historically faced severe discrimination — pervasive and open denial of civil, social, political, educational and economic opportunities. Today, large differences among racial and ethnic groups continue to exist in employment, income and wealth, housing, education, criminal justice, health and other areas. While many factors may contribute to such differences, their size and extent suggest that various forms of discriminatory treatment persist in U.S. society and serve to undercut the achievement of equal opportunity.
Measuring Racial Discrimination considers the definition of race and racial discrimination, reviews the existing techniques used to measure racial discrimination, and identifies new tools and areas for future research. The book conducts a thorough evaluation of current methodologies for a wide range of circumstances in which racial discrimination may occur, and makes recommendations on how better to assess the presence and effects of discrimination.
Blank is dean of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan, Henry Carter Adams Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, and professor of economics. She is also the co-director of the National Poverty Center at the Ford School; Dabady is the Panel on Methods for Assessing Discrimination study director; and Citro is the Panel on Methods for Assessing Discrimination senior program officer. 



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