UCLA Report: Affirmative Action in Higher Ed ‘More Secure’ Now Than Before

In its recent decision to
limit the use of race in assigning students to public schools, the U.S. Supreme
Court justices made it clear that the earlier Grutter v Bollinger
decision involving affirmative action in college admissions would stand. Gary
Orfield said Monday higher education leaders should use that decision to
strengthen their resolve against conservatives’ efforts to end race-conscious
programs.

“The
Court’s reaffirmation of the ruling in Grutter spoke directly to and
repudiated the efforts of conservative groups that had urged the Court to adopt
a sweeping race-blind policy that would undermine Grutter,” reads a report released yesterday by
The Civil Rights Project/ Proyecto Derechos Civiles at the University of California-Los Angeles.

The report, “Charting the Future of College
Affirmative Action: Legal Victories, Continuing Attacks, and New Research,” is
the first to be released since the Civil Rights Project moved from Harvard
University to UCLA earlier this year. In it, nearly 20 scholars weigh in with
various analyses of affirmative action in higher education, including how Grutter
should be interpreted

“We urge leaders
of higher education to resist threats and intimidation and to expand programs
to integrate higher education, programs that are more secure now with the
recent 2007 decision of the reconstituted Supreme Court,” said Orfield,
co-director of the Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles and a professor
of education at the UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information
Studies.

Although the court
left Grutter alone, Orfield and other experts who contributed to the new
report expect ongoing controversy over affirmative action in admissions and
other programs, such as financial aid targeted at underserved groups.

The report can be
found at:

http://www.civilrightsproject.ucla.edu/research/affirmativeaction/
fullreportchartingaa.php

– Diverse Staff

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