Publisher Gives $4 Million to Howard; Communications School to Get New Name

Publisher Gives $4 Million to Howard; Communications School to Get New Name

WASHINGTON

Howard University’s School of Communications soon will have a new name thanks to a $4 million contribution from John H. Johnson, publisher and chairman of Johnson Publishing Company, the publisher of Ebony and Jet magazines. In recognition of Johnson’s gift, the communications school will be named in Johnson’s honor.

“Mr. Johnson is a pioneer in African American publishing,” says Howard University President H. Patrick Swygert. “His contributions to journalism have played an extraordinary role in chronicling the struggles and successes of African Americans in all facets of life for six decades. It is very fitting and with a deep sense of gratitude that we look forward to recognizing Mr. Johnson by naming the new Howard University School of Communications in his honor.”

Johnson says he has admired Howard University since attending “the first NAACP meeting in Baltimore when Thurgood Marshall was named assistant counsel.

“I knew that he was a Howard graduate and I have been so inspired by the marks that he and so many other alumni have made on this nation. I am honored to make a contribution that will help to advance the cause of Howard,” Johnson says.

Johnson also said he wanted to make the contribution because Howard has been an outstanding leader in providing educational opportunities for African Americans.

“Education is still the key to success for all people, especially Black people. Education helped me leave the segregated town of Arkansas City. It helped me establish and succeed in my business,” Johnson says.

Johnson Publishing Co. has contributed to the university’s success by employing a number of Howard University graduates in many facets of the business including journalism, advertising and public relations.

Established in 1942, Johnson’s company is a world leader in the publishing industry and is the No. 1 Black-owned publishing company in the world.



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