INCLUSION IS JUST PART OF THE STORY

“Perspectives: Tradition of Inclusion Left Out of William & Mary President’s Story,” Feb. 26, 2008

Inclusion is indeed part of [President Gene] Nichol’s story, but it is a minor issue in the chaos that Nichol created at W&M. And diversity of intellectual thought was not on his agenda. Four local papers —two student-run, two community-based —have run editorials that best sum up the real reasons Nichol finds himself without the keys to the Wren Chapel anymore (a perk of the president’s office).

—Amelia Peabody

LET’S NOT FORGET HOW WE MADE IT

“Perspectives: Black History Month Is More Important Now Than Ever,” Feb. 25, 2008

Amen to the article by Dr. Ewers, “Black History Month Is More Important Now Than Ever.” We must never forget “how we made it over” and “who prepared the way.” The youth of today must grab hold of the strength, hope and perseverance that sustained generations of African-Americans who lived with a vision of a better tomorrow for their children and grandchildren. They worked hard to make that vision a reality. We owe them “much” love and respect!

 —Wanza L. Jackson

EXCELLENT REPORTING ON FISK

 “Fisk Trial Ends With All Parties Set to Appeal Outcome,” Feb. 22, 2008

Reginald Stuart has written the most profound commentaries on the Fisk University dilemma. Over the years he has covered Fisk from the vantage point of being a skilled and award-winning journalist and one who grew up just blocks from the campus. His writings have often been prophetic and always insightful.

—Peggy Alsup

HBCU/ETS COLLABORATIVE WAS HELPFUL

“ETS and HBCU Deans Work to Improve Students’ Praxis Scores,” Feb. 22, 2008

 Information received during the HBCU/ETS collaborative proved to be exceptional. Beyond compare was the ability to share with each other our conceptual framework, program overview and strategies being used to assist our teacher candidates with the passing of PRAXIS examinations. I look forward to sharing with my colleagues in the College of Education.

—Dr. Andolyn B. Harrison, Professor of Educational Leadership, Grambling State University

APOLOGIZING FOR THE PAST WHILE IGNORING THE PRESENT

“Congress May Apologize to American Indians,” Feb. 20, 2008

The resolution of apology to Native Americans of Kansas speaks of injustices in the past tense. It references past indignities and apologizes “for all action which brought death, harm, humiliation and suffering to the native peoples … .” It speaks of wrongdoing as actions discontinued, as if Kansans have moved on and embraced a new mindset while expressing a willingness to shoulder responsibility for regrettable deeds done and gone. The resolution speaks of past transgressions as if Kansan powers-that-be would never again stoop to such levels of abuse and disregard … “as if these practices have ended — as if they are no longer occurring in Kansas,” says Kansas Citizens for Change President Vickie Burris.

—Fatima Mariana



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