Race, Class, and the Postindustrial City

Race, Class, and the Postindustrial City
By Dr. Frank Harold Wilson
259 pp., $65.50 hardcover
ISBN: 0-7914-6015-0; $21.95 paperback
ISBN: 0791460169;  State University of New York Press, 2004

Race, Class, and the Postindustrial City thoroughly explores the scholarship of Dr. William Julius Wilson, one of the nation’s leading sociologists and public intellectuals, and the controversies surrounding his work. In addressing the connection between postindustrial cities and changing race relations, the author, who is not related to William Julius Wilson, shows how Wilson has synthesized competing theories of race relations, urban sociology and public policy into a refocused liberal analysis of postindustrial America. Combining intellectual biography, the sociology of knowledge and theoretical analyses of sociological debates relevant to African Americans, this book provides both appraisal and critique, ultimately assessing Wilson’s contribution to the sociological canon.
“The very existence of a book on William Julius Wilson is unexpected, as there is rarely a work on a living scholar. Yet, it is clear that such a book is needed: Wilson is the central figure in the area of race and has dominated the dialogue on race for nearly two decades. This is a must-read.'” — Hayward Derrick Horton, coeditor of Skin Deep: How Race and Complexion Matter in the “Color-Blind” Era.
Wilson is associate professor of sociology and urban studies at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.



© Copyright 2005 by DiverseEducation.com