Letters

RALLYING FOR FUNDS

I graduated from Howard University in the spring of 1991. Back then, we did not have a president that seemed able to rally for funds for the school. Since I graduated, I have seen the difference it has made to the university as a whole to have a president and faculty body that recognizes the need for funding from private sectors for the university to grow and strive into being recognized as a first-class institution of higher learning (see “A Fundraising Blueprint,” May 1).

 —Patricia Pennant

INSPIRING NATIVE STUDENTS TO PURSUE STEM

I have benefited from the vision of George Thomas and the others who had a vision to inspire Native students in engineering and science (see “Providing a ‘Full Circle of Support,’” March 6). My sister and I participated in FATE II (First Americans —Tomorrow’s Engineers), and we both became engineers at the University of Oklahoma. I am so thankful for those who came before me and prepared a way for me to succeed! Great article on what a small group of people can do to make change happen and inspire others!

Virginia (Sweeney) Hullinger

A GREAT WAY TO BE REMEMBERED

I recently found out about the departure of Dr. Asa G. Hilliard III. As an employee of several HBCUs and as a student in the early ’70s, I remember Dr. Asa and am grateful for the support and encouragement he provided me in my formative studies. The scholarship in his honor is a nice way to be remembered (see “Taking the Road of Lifelong Learning,” May 15).

Laney Hoxter

ENLIGHTENING STUDENTS ON THE DISCRIMINATIONS OF THE PAST

 “Majority Latino South Texas Town Abolishes Decades-old Segregation,” May 14, 2008 www.diverseeducation.com

I was born in Edinburg, [Texas,] 11 miles away. When news [stories] like this item emerge, one has to wonder what other old ordinances and practices continue to exist on the books, affecting the way citizens still view each other today. Clearly, there have never been activities to educate us to the contrary, since people —those who discriminated, and those who were discriminated against —would rather forget. It seems it would take too much effort to enlighten people about the discriminations of the past, but isn’t that what it would take to help everybody interact better today? Is that why we continue to have more of the same?

—Marco Portales



© Copyright 2005 by DiverseEducation.com