Studying Abroad Gives Graduate School Hopefuls a Competitive Edge

Studying Abroad Gives Graduate School Hopefuls a Competitive Edge

TEMPE, Ariz.

Studying abroad can increase a student’s chances of being accepted into graduate school, experts say. And with more than 1.8 million Americans projected to be enrolled in graduate schools next year, most applicants can use the competitive edge an international education can provide.
“A student who has lived in another culture … learns an adaptive skill that translates to being a more effective manager,” says Dr. Roy A. Herberger Jr., president of Thunderbird Graduate School, which has been ranked No. 1 in international business by U.S. News & World Report for eight consecutive years.
Preparation for graduate school starts in a student’s undergraduate years, but still only 5 percent of undergraduate students actually study abroad, according to officials at Cultural Experiences Abroad (CEA), a study abroad provider based in Tempe, Ariz. By studying abroad, a student can spruce up his résumé by demonstrating the experiences learned and knowledge gained in studying and/or working in a diverse environment.
CEA emphasizes the need for students to expand their education on an international level.
“Obtaining an international education gives the American student a new understanding of different cultures through being immersed in a society, not only in the language … but also the political/economic climate that has grown out of years of history and its effect on peoples behaviors, mannerisms and traditions,” says Brian Boubek, president of CEA.  



© Copyright 2005 by DiverseEducation.com