Report: Poverty and Various Limitations Prevent Better Quality of Life in U.S. Rural South

Black and Hispanic populations lacking internet access suffer consistent perpetual inequalities, according to a new report from the Brookings Institution’s Center for Technology Innovation (CTI). Dr. Nicol Turner LeeDr. Nicol Turner Lee

The study – which polled 1,543 American adults in the rural south – found that poverty and restrictions in education, employment, healthcare, and entrepreneurship prevent access to better quality of life.

The report includes policy recommendations, such as the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) finishing its maps which will help state governments allocate broadband funding; increasing coordination between public and private sectors; and widening the understanding of local institutions' role in getting rural Black, Hispanic, and other vulnerable residents online.

The report marks the launch of CTI's Rural Broadband Equity Project, led by CTI Director Dr. Nicol Turner Lee. The project aims to shed light on the relationships between rural residents, broadband deployment, local anchor institutions, and economic and social opportunities.