BI What’s New

Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems now offers a doctorate of professional studies degree in computing studies for technology professionals. The degree includes part-time distance learning study with courses in applied science, information systems, telecommunications and emerging technologies.
The 48-credit program can be completed through part-time study with limited residency in three years, including the completion of an 18-credit core curriculum, a 12-credit advanced elective sequence and a 12-credit capstone research project. There also is a six-credit research seminar that spans the first two years.
The program offers applied research experience that emerges from the student’s professional environment. “It also responds to the enormous need in the culture for [information technology] professionals who are current,” says Dr. Susan M. Merritt, dean of the university’s computer science and information systems school.
For more information, contact Merritt at (212) 346-1687, or by e-mail at merritt@pace.edu.

The American Indian College Fund has released a series of student handbooks designed to provide both inspiration and financial education to American Indian college students.
The four-handbook series, titled Developing Your Vision While Attending College, provide students  with a step-by-step guide through the process of deciding to go to college and, once enrolled, learning about financial aid and money management.
In addition to statistics and worksheets, the booklets feature stories of Native American student role models as diverse as a U.S. senator, a father of five who both works and goes to school full-time, and a 55-year-old grandmother who has returned to college.
For more information, visit the fund’s Web site at www.collegefund.org.

Claflin College trustees have voted to restore the institution’s historic title. The Orangeburg, S.C., institution will henceforth be known as Claflin University, the name the school first sported when it was chartered in 1869.

Wayne State University in Detroit, Mich., is offering a new three-credit course in African American English beginning this month.
The course will examine the structure, content, use and history of the communication system understood by African Americans.
Topics include: important social and political issues related to African American English as implications for both the general population and educators; understanding the Ebonics debate; and understanding the role of African American English in American history, communications and literature.
The course is being offered by the department of audiology and speech-language pathology in the College of Science. It will be useful for practitioners who intend to work with African American clients.
For more information, contact  the department of audiology andspeech-language pathology at
(313) 577-6288.  Pace University’s School of Computer Science and Information Systems now offers a doctorate of professional studies degree in computing studies for technology professionals. The degree includes part-time distance learning study with courses in applied science, information systems, telecommunications and emerging technologies.
The 48-credit program can be completed through part-time study with limited residency in three years, including the completion of an 18-credit core curriculum, a 12-credit advanced elective sequence and a 12-credit capstone research project. There also is a six-credit research seminar that spans the first two years.
The program offers applied research experience that emerges from the student’s professional environment. “It also responds to the enormous need in the culture for [information technology] professionals who are current,” says Dr. Susan M. Merritt, dean of the university’s computer science and information systems school.
For more information, contact Merritt at (212) 346-1687, or by e-mail at merritt@pace.edu.

The American Indian College Fund has released a series of student handbooks designed to provide both inspiration and financial education to American Indian college students.
The four-handbook series, titled Developing Your Vision While Attending College, provide students  with a step-by-step guide through the process of deciding to go to college and, once enrolled, learning about financial aid and money management.
In addition to statistics and worksheets, the booklets feature stories of Native American student role models as diverse as a U.S. senator, a father of five who both works and goes to school full-time, and a 55-year-old grandmother who has returned to college.
For more information, visit the fund’s Web site at www.collegefund.org.

Claflin College trustees have voted to restore the institution’s historic title. The Orangeburg, S.C., institution will henceforth be known as Claflin University, the name the school first sported when it was chartered in 1869.

Wayne State University in Detroit, Mich., is offering a new three-credit course in African American English beginning this month.
The course will examine the structure, content, use and history of the communication system understood by African Americans.
Topics include: important social and political issues related to African American English as implications for both the general population and educators; understanding the Ebonics debate; and understanding the role of African American English in American history, communications and literature.
The course is being offered by the department of audiology and speech-language pathology in the College of Science. It will be useful for practitioners who intend to work with African American clients.
For more information, contact  the department of audiology andspeech-language pathology at
(313) 577-6288.                



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