WASHINGTON UPDATE – Power Players for HSIs and Tribal Colleges

In Washington, D.C., many individuals aspire to become power players. But the true test is the ability to infl uence policy and legislation, whether from the high perch of a House or Senate leadership post, a crowded offi ce where staffers write the nuts and bolts of federal legislation or the headquarters of grassroots organizations that advocate for change.

As the nation struggles through its toughest recession in decades, the role of power players is more important than ever. With these issues in mind, Diverse begins a two-part look at key federal players for minority-serving institutions. In this issue, we look at some of the many infl uential voices for Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) and tribal colleges. In the next edition, we profi le advocates of historically Black colleges and universities. The list is not designed as the defi nitive list of capital-area power brokers (we take for granted that President Barack Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan are power players for minority-serving institutions, for example). But it is an attempt to identify some high-profi le as well as unsung leaders who play a vital role in federal policy.