NCAA Study Shows Graduation Rates Increasing for Black Student-Athletes

NCAA Study Shows Graduation Rates Increasing for Black Student-Athletes

Indianapolis
The National Collegiate Athletic Association in its annual graduation rate survey released last month, reported that overall graduation rates for Division I student-athletes who entered college in 1993 remained steady, continuing a trend established after higher initial-eligibility standards became effective for entering freshmen in 1986.
Their study also showed that the graduation rate for Division I Black female student-athletes increased from 53 percent a year ago to 57 percent, ending a three-year decrease. Division I Black female basketball players graduated at a rate of 52 percent, three percentage points better than the previous year. Overall graduation rates for Division I female basketball players increased by 1 percent, to 63 percent, stopping a three-year downward trend.
Division I male basketball players showed a slight increase in graduation rates overall and by race. The overall rate increased from 41 percent to 42 percent. The rate for Division I Black male basketball players increased 1 percent, to 34 percent, and the rate for White male basketball players increased from 53 percent to 56 percent.
In many individual categories, the NCAA found that student-athletes continue to graduate at rates higher than their student-body counterparts.
“Overall, these rates are similar to those we’ve been seeing for student-athletes for the past several years. For the most part, student-athletes are performing as well or better than other students in the classroom,”says NCAA President Cedric Dempsey.
This is the eighth consecutive class that has met higher eligibility standards.
Student-athletes who have entered college under Proposition 16 standards, which became effective in 1996, will not become part of the ongoing study for three more years.
For more information on this study, visit www.ncaa.org.



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